Daily Riches: The Knowledge That Transcends Learning (Donald McCullough, Thomas Aquinas and G. K. Chesterton) *

Sometimes it helps to remember that I cannot know everything, no matter how much I try. I constantly feel like I have to know all the answers, find all the solutions, fix everything – myself included – and I so do have limits… And then somebody says, “that’s okay. You’re not supposed to know it all”. I’m not supposed to. Nobody really expects me to. Apart from myself sometimes. That’s the old “should” rule. If there’s a “should” in the sentence (as in “I should know how to do this”), then let it go.
“I should know this!” – Let it go.
“I should be able to handle this!” – Let it go.
“I should look like this!” – Let it go.

Pretty simple rule.
God is good.
God’s news is good.
Have some faith.

“Some things–perhaps the most important–cannot be grasped, regardless of the reach of one’s intellectual prowess. They can only be received. There is a knowledge that cannot be gained by thinking or reasoning or deducing or inducing or experimenting or theorizing; it comes to us, not from us, and it can only be acknowledged, with gratitude and surprise, when it appears in an open heart. We can prepare for this knowledge, paradoxical as it sounds, by encountering the limitations of knowledge. These limitations, by reminding us of our humanity and our relative ignorance, help create the awe and wonder necessary for encountering the deepest, most soul-shaping truths.”

(Donald McCullough)

Richer By Far

“Some things–perhaps the most important–cannot be grasped, regardless of the reach of one’s intellectual prowess. They can only be received. There is a knowledge that cannot be gained by thinking or reasoning or deducing or inducing or experimenting or theorizing; it comes to us, not from us, and it can only be acknowledged, with gratitude and surprise, when it appears in an open heart. We can prepare for this knowledge, paradoxical as it sounds, by encountering the limitations of knowledge. These limitations, by reminding us of our humanity and our relative ignorance, help create the awe and wonder necessary for encountering the deepest, most soul-shaping truths.” Donald McCullough

Thomas Aquinas (c 1225-74) was the greatest of the medieval Doctors of the Church. His life was devoted to prayer, teaching, writing and travel. Although Aquinas had little knowledge of Greek or Hebrew, as a theologian he was unrivalled in intellectual…

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